Dr. Richard Teo, who was a 40-year-old millionaire and cosmetic surgeon with a stage-4 lung cancer shares how to get true satisfaction in life

Recorded at the Dental Christian Fellowship , on 24 Nov 2011, 8 months after his diagnosis.

Richard would have liked to share this with you. We are doing this to continue his work. 

Please have a read and leave it behind for someone else to benefit from his sharing. 

If you would like a copy, please let any of his family or close friends know and we will be able to provide both the audio recording as well as the transcript.

Thank you, and may God bless you richly.

Below is the transcript of the talk of Dr. Richard Teo, who was a 40-year-old millionaire and cosmetic surgeon with a stage-4 lung cancer, sharing at a Dental Christian Fellowship Meeting. He would have liked to share this with you too.

HIS BACKGROUND

Hi good morning to all of you. My voice is a bit hoarse from the chemotherapy, so please bear with me. I thought I'll just introduce myself. My name is Richard, I'm a friend of Danny's, who invited me here.

I'd just begin to say that I'm a typical product of today's society. Before this, I was talking about how the media influences us etc. So I'm a typical product of what the media portrays. From young, I've always been under the influence and impression that to be happy, is to be successful. And to be successful, is to be wealthy. So I led my life according to this motto.

Coming from a poor average family, back in those days, I was highly competitive, whether in sports, studies, leadership. I wanted it all. I've been there, done that. But at the end of the day, it's still about money.

So in my recent last years, I was a trainee in ophthalmology, but I was getting impatient, cos I had friends of mine who were going out into private practise, making tonnes of money. And there I was, stuck in a traineeship. So I said, 'Enough, it's getting too long.' At that time, there was a surge in protégés of aesthetic medicine. I'm sure you're aware, aesthetic medicine had peaked over the last few years, and I saw good money in there. So much so that I said, 'Forget about ophthalmology, I'm gonna do aesthetic medicine.' So that's what I did.

The truth is, nobody makes heroes out of the average GP in the neighbourhood. They don't. They make heroes out of rich celebrities, politicians, rich and famous people. So I wanted to be one of these. I dived straight into aesthetic medicine. People were not willing to pay when I was doing locum back in those days. Anything more than $30, they would complain that "Wah, this lo kun (doctor) jing qwee (very expensive)". They made noise and they were not happy. But the same people were willing to pay $10 000 for a liposuction. So I said, 'Well, let's stop healing the sick, I'm gonna become a beautician; a medically-trained beautician.'

And that was what I did – liposuction, breast augmentation, eyelid surgeries, you name it, we do it. It was very good money. My clinic, when we started off, waiting time was 1 week; 1 month; became 2 months; became 3 months. There was so much demand that people were literally queuing up to have aesthetic work done on them. Vain women – easy life!

So the clinic grew. I was so overwhelmed, from 1 doctor, I employed 2, then 3, then 4 doctors, and carried on. Nothing is ever enough. I wanted more and more and more. So much so that we set up shop in Indonesia to lure all the Indonesian tai tai's. We set up shop, set up a team of people there, to get more Indonesian patients to come in.

So, things were doing well. I'm there, my time has arrived. 

Around some time in February last year, I said, 'OK, I have so much spare cash, it's time to get my first Ferrari. So there I was, getting ready for the deposit. 'OK! There comes my first Ferrari!' I was looking for land, to share with some of my friends. I have a banker friend who makes $5 million a year. So I thought, 'Come, let's come together. Let's buy some land and build our houses.'

I was at my prime, getting ready to enjoy. At the same time, my friend Danny had a revival. They were going back to church, some of my close friends. They told me, 'Richard, come, join us, come back to church.'

I have been a Christian for 20 years; I was baptised 20 years ago, but it was because it was fashionable to be a Christian then. All my friends were becoming Christians then. It was fashionable! I wanted to be baptised, so that when I filled in a form, I could put there "Christian" – feels good. In truth, I had never had a bible; I don't know what the bible is all about.

I went to church for a while, after some time, I got tired. I said it's time to go to NUS, stop going to church. I had a lot more things to pursue in NUS – girls, studies, sports etc. After all, I had achieved all these things without God today, so who needs God? I myself can achieve anything I want.

In my arrogance, I told them, "You know what? You go tell your pastor to change your sermon to 2pm. I will consider coming to church." Such arrogance! And I said 1 statement in addition to that – till date, I don't know I've regretted saying that – I told Danny and my friends, "If God really wanted me to come back to church, He will give me a sign.". Lo and behold, 3 weeks later, I was back at church.







THE DIAGNOSIS


In March 2011, out of the blues – I was still running around, 'cause I'm a gym freak and I always go to the gym training, running, swimming 6 days a week. I had some backache, and that's all I had, but it was persistent. And so I went for an MRI to exclude prolapsed disc. And the day before I had my scan, I was still in the gym, lifting heavy weights, doing my squats. And the next day, they found that half my spine had bone marrow replacement. I said, "Woah, sorry, what's that?" 

We had a PET scan the next day, and they diagnosed that I had terminal lung cancer, stage 4B. It had spread to the brain, half the spine, whole of my lungs were filled with tumour, liver, adrenals…

I said, "Can't be, I was just at the gym last night, what's going on?" I'm sure you know how it feels – though I'm not sure if you know how it feels. One moment I was there at the peak, the next day, this news came and I was totally devastated. My whole world just turned upside down. 

I couldn't accept it. I have a hundred relatives on both sides, my mom and my dad. 100 of them. And not a single one has cancer. To me, in my mind, I have good genes, I'm not supposed to be having this! Some of my relatives are heavy chain smokers. Why am I having lung cancer? I was in denial.


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